Life Experiences as a Player

If I try to relive my most typical experience with games, it would be a picture of my face sitting a foot from a screen, my eyes intently following each pixel on the screen, the back hunched forward—the same posture, for hours on end. I have played video games ever since I was 6, even till now. I delved into a variety of games starting with the Gameboy Advance and Nintendo DS Lite and moving up to the Xbox 1 and PC as consoles improved and my general interests changed. As much as I would like to illustrate my 8-hour non-stop game marathons of Pokemon, Minecraft, Call of Duty, or Counter-Strike: Global Offensive while talking to my friends virtually via Discord, my most meaningful memories as a player wasn’t when my eyes were glued onto a digital screen, but rather when I engaged in non-digital games with the physical company of my friends.

Born in South Korea, I moved to Kansas at the early age of 4 where my family and I settled in the average U.S suburbia, composed of many houses and the neighborhood school. My neighborhood—Lionsgate—was filled with families with kids that were my age, all attending the neighborhood school, Blue Valley Elementary/Middle. Within my cul de sac, my family got extremely close with our neighbors: the Maybry’s, the Nordstrom’s, and the Haas’s. Our bonds were instantly formed as we all spent our mundane elementary and middle school days with playing basketball. All of us being in either elementary or middle school, we spent every evening playing basketball after we got dropped from the school bus until we were called in for dinner. Each house, with the exception of mine, had a driveway basketball goal. Our crew would go to one of the 3 hoops and play a series of basketball games like Horse, Knock Out, and 4v4’s. Whenever we had to refresh ourselves with a cool beverage the host usually provided it. Seeing that we would knock out can after bottle of drinks, each household just brought out our down drinks from our garage fridges. These drinks, ranging from Coke and Fresca to SUNNYD and Capri Suns, subsequently formed an economy as we traded with each other. Funny enough, my Korean household didn’t consume anything other than water or tea, so I introduced my friends with Korean snacks called Choco Pies and Ppushu Ppushu and even Korean spicy ramen. My friends’ mind-boggling discovery of Korean foods led to a spike in demand, turning my Korean foods into prized luxury items. The simple game of basketball facilitated what were just a couple of kids that went to the same school to a close-knit crew where we frequented sleepovers at my house where we spent nights hanging out and eating Korean ramen that my mom would prepare.Another enjoyable game that requires that company of others is chess. When I switched from Blue Valley Elementary to a school in Kansas City, MO in the 3rd grade, all elementary students were required to stay in the library before we were dismissed for our first class. In that library, there were chess sets. Each morning, we set up games and played against each other. Nothing was competitive, just a “chill” game where we warmed up our brains for our exciting classes of the day. Chess is different from other typical games because it requires no physical proficiency, just your brain. Although chess is normally considered a game reserved for 2 people facing each other off, we made a version where there were 2 chess games going at the same time. There were 2-person teams; the same rules were applied but each piece you got, you were to hand it over to your teammate playing right next to you until someone from a team lost all pieces. These chess games were memorable, as the social scene was delightful. All in all, although games played solo can indeed be fun, I think that games where you experience with the company of your fellow peers is much more memorable.

Choco Pie points the way for diplomacy with South Korea - Nikkei Asian  Review
Choco Pies
Amazon.com: Ottogi Ppushu Ppushu Noodle Snacks (BBQ)
Ppushu Ppushu

Another enjoyable game that requires that company of others is chess. When I switched from Blue Valley Elementary to a school in Kansas City, MO in the 3rd grade, all elementary students were required to stay in the library before we were dismissed for our first class. In that library, there were chess sets. Each morning, we set up games and played against each other. Nothing was competitive, just a “chill” game where we warmed up our brains for our exciting classes of the day. Chess is different from other typical games because it requires no physical proficiency, just your brain. Although chess is normally considered a game reserved for 2 people facing each other off, we made a version where there were 2 chess games going at the same time. There were 2-person teams; the same rules were applied but each piece you got, you were to hand it over to your teammate playing right next to you until someone from a team lost all pieces. These chess games were memorable, as the social scene was delightful. All in all, although games played solo can indeed be fun, I think that games where you experience with the company of your fellow peers is much more memorable.

Another enjoyable game that requires that company of others is chess. When I switched from Blue Valley Elementary to a school in Kansas City, MO in the 3rd grade, all elementary students were required to stay in the library before we were dismissed for our first class. In that library, there were chess sets. Each morning, we set up games and played against each other. Nothing was competitive, just a “chill” game where we warmed up our brains for our exciting classes of the day. Chess is different from other typical games because it requires no physical proficiency, just your brain. Although chess is normally considered a game reserved for 2 people facing each other off, we made a version where there were 2 chess games going at the same time. There were 2-person teams; the same rules were applied but each piece you got, you were to hand it over to your teammate playing right next to you until someone from a team lost all pieces. These chess games were memorable, as the social scene was delightful. All in all, although games played solo can indeed be fun, I think that games where you experience with the company of your fellow peers is much more memorable.